Big Island – Hāhālua and more

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away!

Hāhālua, or manta, is a large fish swimming in the waters around Hawaii. Wing span can be up to 5 meters of this super friendly pacific manta ray. “They have no real teeth, no stinger, and a harmless disposition. Their only defense is to flee. These huge and gentle creatures feed on a food source of almost all microscopic organisms called plankton, so Manta must work very hard to get this tiny food. At night, light attracts brine shrimp, a form of plankton that rays feed on.  Using their cephalic fins like big scoops, they funnel water into their wide-open mouths and filter out these organisms.

We wanted to see them and decided to book a very touristic tour to a bay which is lit with lots and lots of lamps, attracting the plankton and thus the manta rays. Probably with 50 divers we were sitting at the bottom of the bay, lighting it up with our lamps. After a little while she came. A young ray, probably 1.5 – 2 meters wide, swimming and feeding itself. Mouth wide open swimming, no better flying over our heads.
In the end we arrived back safely in the harbour. We had a great dive, even though I was so, so sea sick. Lost a lot of weight there and fed the manta’s. So, it was all on me this time.

The next day we make a slow start. My stomage finaly relaxed again, so I needed food. Breakfast with a view on the sea, palm trees and a giant cruise ship. Hahaha, time to leave before all the guests start swarming the town. We drive slowly to Volcano, passing by some nice spots along the way. First of all the beach where Captain Cook got murdered in the end. To be honest, it is a very nice place now. Then to Pu’uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park (try saying that). This is a beatiful historical site with some houses and wood carvings representing ancient times. A great place to have lunch, with a view again. White beach, palm trees, nice swell and some lovely cardinal birds.
Next stop painted church, which is very nicely painted on the inside, and black sand beach. The last is well known for the endangered green turtles which come to the shore to just relax on the beach. Luckily, many Hawaiian volunteers do their best to protect these animals.
At the end of the day we arrive at Holoholo inn, a nice hostal, owned by an old Japanese world traveller in the town called Volcano. We enjoy a Thai dinner and go to sleep. We are the only guests tonight. It feels strange to be alone in this large place, but we sleep well.

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