Category Archives: Other

Goodbye summer. Hello autumn.

FALL, LEAVES, FALL
by Emily Brontë

Fall, leaves, fall; die, flowers, away;
Lengthen night and shorten day;
Every leaf speaks bliss to me
Fluttering from the autumn tree.
I shall smile when wreaths of snow
Blossom where the rose should grow;
I shall sing when night’s decay
Ushers in a drearier day.

Fall, the most depressing season according to many. I always have mixed feelings, realising summer is over, the long cold winter is due to arrive. I do not like cold. I do not like rainy days. I do not like the monotonous colours. I definitely do not like the short days. Yes, there is a lot not to like. An if I would only see these things, I will get depressed for sure. However…

Fall is the season of the nicest colours in nature: red, orange, yellow. The leaves are colouring. The grass is still green. Mushrooms pop up everywhere, especially the red cap with white dots.Lovely! And best of all, sometimes the sun manages to break the skies, peeking through the clouds, sending us a last warm regard. The nice moments are there, you just have to see them, and when you see them, you have to enjoy them to the max. It can be over soon.

I love walking in the woods in thus season. Especially shambling in the fallen leaves. The crispy sound under my soles, the smell of wet leaves and mushrooms, mist on the fields and the first night frost. It is nice to sit on the couch with a snuggy snug rug, a glass of hot tea or very nice wine. Time to make new holiday plans, prepare for the holidays and sleep. The days shorten, I am cycling to work in the dark, but also when I go home it is already getting dark. Boring? Yes, in a way, but all the lights on the road, in the shopping streets and in peoples houses give me a happy cosy feeling. ‘Gezellig’ as we say in Dutch. A word which cannot be translated. It says everything about the essence of our culture and this time of year.

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Heather and ‘hunebedden’ (dolmens)

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“Kaokeln is gien kuunst, maor eierkeggen wal” – easier said than done (Drents proverb)

Nice weather is predicted, so I decide to go for another few days of cycling in The Netherlands. After some puzzling and surfing the internet I decide to go to the province of Drenthe. I think I created a nice tour.

Day 1: Coevorden – Dwingeloo

I park my car in Coevorden, put the bags on my bike and take off. First stop is Orvelte, a car-free, historic village with a nice green, originated in the Middle Ages. Typical Drenthe, with nice historical farms and a real horsetram (for the tourists). The atmosphere is nicely busy and I decide to take a break. Not for long, as I still want to cycle to Westerbork. My goal is a memorial center for the former transit camp from World War II. Not a nice stop, but a stop I think I should have seen. More than a 100.000 people have been transported to the various concentration camps between 1942 and 1945. A long row of posts along the road remind visitors of the dates of each transport and the number of people on it. The row seems endless and the numbers are varying from a few hundred to a few thousand per transport… A bit further on the road a few remains of barracks, a transportation wagon, a piece of the original train track and a very impressive monument with 107.000 stones can be found. One stone for each person in the transports. Unbelievable! At the entrance of the center I see a small suitcase with the text “what if you have to flee”. Now, in 2016, millions of people all over the world are still on the run. It looks like we have not learned from the past.

Deeply impressed by what I have seen and learned I continue my tour in the direction of Beilen and National Park Dwingelder Field. I cycle through meadows with cows, forrest and over plains with heather and herds of sheep. These areas are very wide and at what beautiful moment I have decided to come here. The heather is blooming turning the fields purple. After 80 kilometer I find a nice campsite just before the town of Dwingeloo. It is very quiet and lies in the National Park. I even hear some hooves around the tent at night. Is it deer or wild hogs, I have no clue.

Day 2: Dwingeloo – Rolde

I am lazy and get up late. I have all day, so I decide to take it easy. First of all I cycle over the beautiful Dwingelder Field to Dwingeloo, again a very nice village with a green and many cosy restaurants. Time for coffee! After, I continue in the direction of Diever. In the forrest I stop to visit a hideout called ‘Wigwam’. Made in 1943 by some resistance fighters from Diever to hide in. Again impressive and I am happy these kind of monuments are free for visitors to check out and learn about their history.

The tour follows the border between the provinces of Drenthe and Friesland and crosses the fantastic nature park Drents-Friese Wold. Great plains with heather and forrest are the decor, filled with some cyclists, hikers and sheep. I pass Appelscha, a village in Friesland, and arrive in one of the best preserved areas of peat moor in The Netherlands, the Fochteloër moor. It is again a beautiful area. Once people cut the peat for a living in these areas. Lucky for us we can enjoy this moor now, as the peat cutting times where about over when this area was up for production.

By the time I reach Assen, I am having cravings for pizza. I cycled for almost 75 kilometer and decide to stop at the first restaurant which serves a nice one. After a heavenly meal I continue my route through the nice evening glow to the campsite in Rolde. On my route I of course visit the statue of Bartje, a hero from Dutch children’s books and a tv-series around a century ago. He became world famous in The Netherlands for his quote ‘ik bid nie veur bruune boon’n‘’ (I do not pray for brown beans).

Day 3: Rolde – Coevorden

Already the last day. I get up early. It is misty, but this time a year that usuall means a nice sunny day lies ahead. I cycle over the Hondsrug, a sand ridge arisen in the second last ice age, over 130.000 years ago. Nowadays it is part of the first Geopark in The Netherlands. It is also the area of many prehistoric dolmens or ‘hunebedden’ as we say in Dutch. These barrows were build by people from the Funnel Beaker culture. Their age is estimated at about 3500 to 5000 years old. and they are still there. Close to Rolde I see my first one, next to a modern cemetery. Beautiful. Along the route I pass a few more, some small, others bigger. The biggest can be found in the town of Borger, where there is also a center (Hunebedcentrum) and information center for the Geopark. It is very busy and unfortunately the visitors do not respect the prehistoric monuments. I leave quickly before I start discussions with them.

The tour proceeds through nice forrests, over beautiful heaths and past many historical farms in the many villages. I pass the large town of Emmen and after again 75 kilometerI arrive back in Coevorden. This is also a historical town, which actually looks best from the air. It is a fortified town with a very impressive star shaped moat.

It was a nice cycle tour again, passing beautifull and impressive spots and again with many sweet people along the way. “Tot ‘n anermoal!” (See you again)

Cycle tour around Twente (NL)

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Nie lull’n moar poets’n (Twente quote ~ make it happen)

Well, I did make it happen! A cycle tour in Twente, it was on my to-do-list for a while. Just 3 days of cycling, 180 km according to the information leaflet I found on the internet. In the end I cycled over 210. No clue if it was due to my navigation skills or the cosy little villages I passed. The extra 30 km were fun as well.

day 1: Delden – Lemele

In Delden I drive off. My bike is loaded, I really took everything. After many years I notice I have to get used to cycling with the packs again. I have more than enough gear, but what to take when the nights are still rather chilly and I do not want to eat in restaurants all the time. In the end I always take too much, as I did now. Anyway, I just loaded everything on the bike and take off in a very good mood. Goal of the day is Lemele, a small village some 65 km away. I follow the signs of the long distance cycle tour LF15(b) – farmers route (Boerenlandroute), and later the LF8(b). My first stop is already after a few kilometers, Twickel estate and castle. An impressive historic estate from the 14th century, situated in a beautiful park. A good start I would say!

Happily I move on, cycling through nice scenery. Sometimes mainly agricultural with a lot of meadows, farms, cows, sheep, lama’s and sometimes more woody. Over sandy tracks and gravel, through heathland, over streams and rivers, through forrest. All very beautiful and with so many birds singing lovely songs. I spot a bird of prey who wants to land on my path but is scared of at the last minute and a small stone marten. I cycle alone for large parts… where is everybody? Are there people living here? Am I really such a townie? But when I am enjoying some traditional Twente raisin bread (krentenwegge) at a picnic spot, a couple decides to stop here as well and we have a lovely chat. They speak the Twente dialect to which I just have to get used to a bit. After an hour we go our separate ways again.

All of a sudden I see a commemorative plate with a garlant around it. I stop and read it. It is a reminder of an aircraft crash during the 2nd World War. Part of a project called ‘Opdat niet wordt vergeten’ (Lest one should not forget) crash sites are marked. Gosh, this is quite a different viewpoint on this lovely day.

Impressed by a very nice day I arrive in the little village of Lemele. I am tired but have to find some dinner in the local supermarket and proceed to the small nature campsite ‘De Olde Lucashoeve’. A very hospitable location where I am happy to pitch my tent for the night.

day 2: Lemele – Beuningen

After a good night sleep in a very quiet area, I am awakened by many birds and loud bangs in the distance. Are there hunters in this area? I pack my stuff and jump on my bike again. This will be the longest cycling day of this weekend, so I better start early. And what a start. Just after I leave the campsite the road climbs. In the Netherlands? Yes. I am on the Sallandse Heuvelrug (ridge) en just next to the Lemeler ‘Mountain’. This is a moraine from the last ice age and is roughly 60 meters high. It does not sound very impressive, but with the extra 10+ kgs I do feel it. Nice start of the day. After an hour I reach Ommen… coffee! I find a pleasant terrace in the historic centre and enjoy a good cup of coffee and a nice conversation with a rock ‘n roll lover. I enjoy meeting people, even though I will probably never meet them again.

After the coffee I cycle part of the LF16(a) – Vecht valley route (Vechtdalroute), along the river Vecht. Beautiful nature again. It is not a very sunny day, but that does not matter. I pass a lot of meadows again, find some sand dunes in the forrest and all of a sudden I see a small farm/brewery ‘De Pauw’. A real surprise I would say. After a while I switch to the LF14(a) – Saxony route (Saksenroute). I pass a few nice towns and villages today. After Ommen I cycle through Vroomshoop, Tubbergen, Ootmarsum and a bit of Denekamp. Especially Ootmarsum is a lively little town. Many art shops and pleasant terraces. I would love to stay, but I can see it coming. A dark cloud is moving my way. As I still have to cover another 10 km to the destination of today, I decide to speed up a bit.

Just below Denekamp is the little town of Beuningen. It is small and has a nice nature campsite called ‘Olde Kottink’. This is a true discovery, where I am welcomed with a very good cup of coffee. In the mean time a lot of fun is going around in the yard. Kids are baking some bread-on-a-stick above a small fire, grown ups are sitting at large picnic tables with a glas of wine or a beer. Rapidly I pitch my tent and return for my own glass of wine. After dinner I decide to go for a small walk. I spot a deer with 2 calfs. Being a townie I do not see nature like this too often and after the long cycle trip of today (~ 76 km) I enjoy it a lot!

day 3: Beuningen – Delden

Last day already. I wake up from the small pitter-patter of rain on my tent. Not a very annoying sound, but the idea to cycle in the rain is not appealing. I decide to just relax some more, for I only have to cycle around 60 km today. I am in no hurry. When I finally get up and walk to the sanitary building I spot something nice. Fresh slices of the Twente raisin bread for the guests. I decide this will be my breakfast, hmmm…

The sun breaks through, I wait for the tent to dry, talk a bit with other cyclists and at around 11 am I hop on my bike. Today I cycle in the direction of the large city of Enschede. The route officially goes straight through town, but I like cycling in nature so I decide to take the LF4(a) Centre of Netherlands route (Midden-Nederland route), passing just above Enschede. Along the way I pass a ‘Klopkeshoes’. A very tiny house showing how single women in the past were living, serving the landlord and God. Gosh.

In the village De Lutte I drink a cup of coffee and spot a statue of a hellhound (hellehond), a mythological figure which mainly was ‘spotted’ here. In folk tales, the hellhound was bringer of imminent disaster. I don’t want to think, just cycle. I pass a colorful field of sunflowers, dark forrest, muddy paths, a few small chapels and again beautiful landscapes. Close to Enschede the environment is more urbane. The route runs through an area with a mental institution, crosses the campus of the University and passes the football stadium of FC Twente. It is Sunday and Summer holidays, so everywhere I go it is quiet, hardly any people on the streets and for the first time I think the route is a bit boring. Until I reach Boekelo. A small village, known for the salt industry in the past. Along the road many small huts can be found. End of the 19th century a salt layer was discovered and from within these small huts people started producing the salt. They are everywhere. I need to find the story behind this when I get home.

After more than 65 km I am back in Delden. I have missed the route a few times in the last part, mostly because some signs were missing. That explains the extra kilometers I would say. This was a very beautiful cycle tour through a wonderful part of The Netherlands. I enjoyed the landscape, the hospitality, the lovely people I met on the way and the delicious raisin bread. Should do this more often!

Roparun 2016

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“To ad life to the days, where days cannot be added to life anymore.”

Roparun – an event with a good cause. While running non-stop in relay from Paris (or Hamburg) to Rotterdam (524 kilometer) in the Pentecost weekend, money is collected for people with cancer. Since 3 years I am member and coordinator of one of the 400 teams joining in this challenge.

Our team, Teamall4Friends, consists of 25 people: 8 Runners, 6 cyclists, 2 navigators, 5 drivers, 2 catering ladies, a masseur and a team captain. The run is a relay race with 2 sub-teams of 4 runners, each covering about 30 to 50 km per stage. In the end, each runner has covered roughly 65 km. The whole run takes about 43 hours. Throughout the year sponsors are contacted and events are organised to collect money for the foundation and for the run itself. After a whole year of planning, collecting funds and arranging the necessities for our run, Pentecost has come and we finally go to Paris.
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Roparun – 14 – 16 May
It feels good to see everybody again. The people in my team I know, but not on a very personal level. Yes, we spend 3 days together in rather tough circumstances. Non-stop, day and night we are on the road. We do everything together without much sleep, we eat little and are sometimes packed for hours in a small bus. It gives some feeling of intimacy. We talk, laugh, sing, complain, suffer, give compliments… we agree to be honest to each other. How will it be this year?
The weather is reasonable. Pentecost is early so it is cold, very cold. Especially in the night shifts. But it is mostly dry. The exciting feeling at the start is all we need for the first stage. The average speed is high, 12,5 km/hr. The guys love to run. We sub-devided the stages in small bits.1km running, 3 km rest, 1 run, 3 rest, and on and on and on. Until the stage is over and our next team is taking over.
I am a navigator. I keep us on track, inform the sub-team of challenges to be overcome during the stage and am the trouble shooter. If something happens, I find the solution, I fix the navigation, put batteries in the GPSes, feed the cyclists and keep the driver alert. I am the contact person for the base camp and our other team. A role I really like, because no stage is the same. I can look outside, make pictures and post them on our live site and on twitter and facebook. Just to keep the home front informed.

This year I will also run in one of the stages. Something I really like to experience myself. What do they feel, how do they experience the route, the supporters, the other teams on the road. It is only a bit more than 10 km, but I love it. Running in the beautiful countryside of northern France, crossing the border to Belgium, hearing the cheers and getting tired. I want more. There was not more this year. Maybe next year?

The days are intense. First night no real sleep. Just a power nap of maybe 15 minutes. Second day I still feel ok. Get a bit of sleep on a small camp bed on a parking somewhere in Belgium. Funny idea and part of the adventure. Just get into your sleepingbag somewhere and try to get some sleep in the open air. Lovely. Along the route are many villages giving us a warm welcome. People are awake day and night and party as long as the teams pass by. Next night again just a power nap. Fatigue is entering our bodies and minds. Small annoyances come up, but nothing too serious. Every year I am surprised how most people can manage, even though they must feel dead tired. Somewhere I seem to enjoy it so much, that it overcomes the negative feelings. We are on a mission!

In the morning of the third day we arrive on a large parking. We share it with all the other teams. Busy, tired faces, sore legs, but still eager to go for the last 60 kms. There are showers in the public swimming pool. Yes, time to take care of myself a bit. It is lovely and will keep me going until the evening. In the mean time the ladies from the catering are making pancakes and grilled toast with cheese.

After 43 hours in the race, and 55 hours of being ‘awake’ we finish in Rotterdam. We finish almost 2 hours ahead of planning, with an average speed of 12,1 km/hr. We are 26th of 252 finishing teams. We feel good! We meet our family and friends at the finish line and after the official ceremony and group picture we feel tired but so satisfied. We did it again!

Now, after a few nights of sleep I feel proud. I am part of a great team. Even though I meet some people only for these 3 days, I can still say sincerely that I love  them!

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