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Mountains, prayer flags and red powder (part 2)

People do not decide to become extraordinary. They decide to accomplish extraordinary things – Sir Edmund Hillary

Not that I am extraordinary or want to be. As a lowlander (living below sea level) I just am a bit afraid of the Thorong La Pass. At 5416m altitude it will be the highest point I ever set foot on. And I am not sure I can make it. So, the morning of the crossing of the pass I am sort of scared. We get up in the dark, have a small breakfast and take off at 4am. My legs have no power, I feel tired and realize I have to climb 1000m to get over it. With -12 degrees Celsius my sugar aids (Cola & Snickers) start to freeze. But then, as soon as the sun starts lighting up the tops of the mountains around us I get the power. After a bit more than 2 hours we are there, Thorong La. It makes me emotional, what a sensational feeling and how colourfull are all the prayer flags. I am on the top of my world and still mountains are towering above me. This place is extraordinary!

And then down, down, down. 1800m to Muktinath (15km). The views are incredible and so different. This valley is much more desert-like. Small, Tibetan-style towns are build on bare rock. Maybe it is the season, but hardly anything grows here. Just in the river beds there is some agriculture. Interesting to say the least, and we are walking in it. Our senses stimulated by this environment. Of course, the past 7 days we mostly climbed up, so now we mostly go down.

We hike to Jomsom (20km), where we take the bus to Ghasa. It is the most boring part of the circuit, so skipping 30km on a very bumpy and dusty road is a good thing. From Ghasa we cross the river and follow a nice track through some beautiful Nepali landscapes, away from the dusty road. First stop is Tatopani. A busy little town, renowned for its hot waters (tato pani). Heavy rains tell us the monsoon starts early this year. Luckily we hike in the morning, thus making sure we are in our tea houses in time.

The next stops are Sikha (8km), a small town in a lush green valley, with view on the Annapurna range in the background, and Ghorepani (8km). Ghorepani is starting point for the Poon Hill trek and touristic. Many guesthouses, many tourists and excellent views on the Annapurna’s and Dhaulagiri mountains. With the flowers of the Rhododendron in the foreground this is magical. The next morning we get up before sunrise again and hike up to Poon Hill (3200m). The sun rises slowly, illuminating the mountains in a mystical glow. Even though our guide says it is not a good sunrise, I love it. We go down, have breakfast and descent to Birethani (21km, 1050m). 85% Of the way are stone steps down. It leaves us not only with great memories of splendid views, but also with pain in our legs which the locally produced ‘moonshine’ Roxy cannot cure either.

The last hiking day is a short one. We go to the bus stop in Nayapul to take the bus to Pokhara. A small thriving city (2nd in Nepal) next to a nice lake, where we slowly acclimatize again. Now not to the altitude, but the hectic life. We are close to the main street, full with shops and restaurants. What a lot of noise… We rent a bicycle to make a nice cool cycle tour along the lake to Pame and further. In the evening we have a farewell dinner. Part of the group will stay here for some days. It is time to say goodbye to a magnificent trip with a magnificent group.

The next day we drive back to Kathmandu, check in into our hotel and go shopping. Just one more day. We spend it with some of our group on the Monkey temple (Swoyambhunath Stupa) and in Bhaktapur. Hinduism and Budhism go hand in hand in these places. Monks are praying, prayer flags colour the temples and stupas and the Hindu gods are coloured with red and yellow powder. These places are both World Heritage Sites and heavily damaged by the earthquake a few years ago. Sad to see, but still nice to also see tourists. With the fees money is raised to rebuild the historic monuments. It will take a lot of time due to many rules and regulations, but they will get there.

And me… I will be back for sure. I have travelled a lot in my life and realize I now have found a country I really like and possibly even love. This feeling needs more exploring!

“I will go anywhere, as long as it is forward”- David Livingston

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