Tag Archives: mccarthy

Tundra, taiga and copper – Alaska

To the lover of wilderness, Alaska is one of the most wonderful countries of the world – John Muir

Alaska is more then Bears and Moose… it is the country of tundra and taiga. Taiga being the wide, widespread forrest of pine, larch and spruce trees. Locally sometimes called drunken spruce trees, for due to the permafrost the roots cannot really hold the trees and they start “wandering”. The taiga can be somewhat boring, as the trees block spectacular views. However, Moose like taiga and the small lakes. We see quite a lot of them along the roadside.
Tundra is the open, empty landscape, but full of small vegetation like mosses and lichens. The views are mostly beautiful, especially when the snowy tops of the Alaska range are filling the background. Caribou love the lichen.

Our next stop is after 170km driving on the unpaved Denali Highway, straight through tundra and taiga. White tops in the background, broad river banks in the foreground. Hardly any human being. Just pure loneliness. You can get lost here for a long time, but then life will be very tough. We stop at a roadhouse at Tangle River. It is a blockhut type place, build in a beautiful scenery with some small lakes to canoe on. However, it interior is utterly kitch and it makes our imagination go wild. In the end my bunkbed really sucks, but the inhabitants are hilarious. They would do well in a real life soap!

We move on along the Copper river in the direction of Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park & Preserve. Another amazing area in Alaska with spectacular nature ans some cultural heritage. The Alaskan native population already knew what was officially discovered end of the 1900’s. These mountains have (had) many copper deposits. It is even said, that the mines of the twin town of McCarthy and Kennicott held the largest ores ever discovered. It was mined for 40 years and transported by boat and railway. What is left are 2 small towns. Kennicott is now sort of a ghost town with some historic buildings and ruins. It is now starting point to amazing tours in the steep mountains surrounding it, and of course the magnificent Root Glacier. McCarthy, once the town of sins, is now a tourist town with hotel, some restaurants and adventure activities.

We camp on the river bank of the Kennicott river and make some memorable hikes. The first along the Root Glacier, on top of the moraine. We see bear droppings everywhere, so it is somewhat exciting to walk here. The next day we hike up to the Bonanza Mine. The trail is over 7 km one way and it ascents 1200 meter. No flat spots here, but amazing views. Reaching the old, wooden and ruined copper mine, we see pieces of green and blue Malachite and Azurite everywhere. This is so surreal. Very impressed we hike down the long steep path again. How tough life must have been 100 years ago.

Holiday is almost over. We drive back in the direction of Anchorage. We see the first traffic lights in 10 days, we see cars and people. It is busy and the rain does not help getting rid of the feeling that the holiday is almost over. The last night we spend on a riverbank with view on the Matanuska glacier (if it would have been clear). We have a nice Dr. Pepper marinated ribs dinner and a few campfire stories. Our guide/cook Phil tells us his story of a grizzly bear attack he barely survived in 1999 (Story in the newspaper) and another nice poem of Robert Service. No matter how nice the campsite is, when I close my eyes later on in the tent, I think back to Phil’s story and the many nights this trip we slept in this small tent in the same wilderness. Brrr…

Back in Anchorage the trip is over. We do some souvenir shopping and that is it. A last hike along the Knik and off we go. Alaska, it has been great!

There’s gold, and it’s haunting and haunting;
It’s luring me on as of old;
Yet it isn’t the gold that I’m wanting
So much as just finding the gold.
It’s the great, big, broad land ’way up yonder,
It’s the forests where silence has lease;
It’s the beauty that thrills me with wonder,
It’s the stillness that fills me with peace.

The Spell of the Yukon – Robert Service

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